DRINKING BUDDIES

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Directory of Wine With Corks!!!

A group on Facebook I ritualistically follow called 100% Cork has just updated this for all of you who are interested in Cork-Only wines!

100% Cork announced the launch today of CorkWatch, an on-line directory of more than 1,500 wines that indicates which ones are sealed with natural cork.

"U.S. wine drinkers overwhelmingly prefer wine with cork, but it has been difficult for them to determine if a bottle is sealed with a cork or a plastic stopper," said Peter Weber, Executive Director of the Cork Quality Council.  "CorkWatch lifts the veil on wine closures by providing definitive information about whether a bottle of wine is finished with real cork or not."

CorkWatch can be accessed at www.corkwatch.org  or the campaign's Facebook page.  The Facebook page has more than 36,000 fans, many of whom have asked how to determine if a bottle of wine is sealed with genuine cork.

The resource was launched with 1,540 wines derived largely from A.C. Nielson's listings of top selling premium brands.  More than 50 wineries made entries to CorkWatch on the first day they were offered the opportunity to do so.  CorkWatch users are encouraged to enter additional wine varietals.

About 100% Cork
100% Cork is a campaign to educate U.S. wine consumers about the benefits of choosing wine with real cork because of cork's environmental, technical and societal advantages.  The campaign seeks to recruit and organize wine consumers to request that winemakers and retailers choose natural cork over artificial stoppers.  The campaign is funded by the Portuguese Cork Association and the Cork Quality Council.
SOURCE 100% Cork


Fight back the synthetics and screw cups!


100% Cork Everytime!!!
Join the website, sign the petition, and submit any info on new wines and whether or not they have all natural cork!

Bon Boire!

11 comments:

  1. Sorry about my lack of knowledge of, but is it because cork in some way enhances a drink that people favour it over synthetic cork or is it just because of sentimental value?

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  2. Naw the cork is just more like a classy thing, aslo who tries to collect corks?

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  3. I don't really know if it makes any difference, but I suppose part of having wine is sometimes the aesthetic part... or the showing off part!

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  4. Not sure. I'm reluctant to pay up for whites and happily drink screw-tops. With reds it depends - often a screw-top is a red flag that a wine is "easy drinking" i.e. syrupy.

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  5. Isn't the cork oak being decimated by some kind of disease?

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  6. the natural are better for playing and such, you can just burn them and such things

    they are wonderful

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  7. Good lord that's alot of corks!

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  8. That's really cool, great design.

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